ILL (Institut Laue-Langevin)

The Max von Laue Paul Langevin Institute (ILL), located in Grenoble, France, was founded in January 1967.

The ILL High Flux Reactor (HFR) operates at a thermal power of 58.3 MW, using a single enriched uranium fuel element. The neutrons produced are directed to the 40 instruments used by scientists to conduct experiments.

A wide range of areas can benefit from research at the ILL, including pharmacy, biology, chemistry, environment, geology, industry, fundamental and applied physics research and nanotechnology.

The direct applications in the field of biosciences are related to the study of proteins, enzymes, new drugs, cellular processes in vivo and the passage of drugs across cell membranes.

In the field of energy, for example, these applications make it possible to study catalysts and optimise chemical yields, superconducting materials that will one day enable energy to be transported without any loss, and the development of new solar cells based on organic materials.

Spanish participation

Spain was the first country to join the ILL as an associate scientific member in 1987.

In addition, the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) has signed annual collaboration agreements with the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - France) for the use of the ILL's D1B instrument as a CRG (Collaborating Research Group).

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